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Kiran Coetzee
Kiran Coetzee
Kiran Coetzee
Now 17-years-old, Kiran Coetzee’s first experience with writing was when he joined the school newspaper at Uplands College. After exploring his writing capabilities he found he was intoxicated by the world that unfolds while writing. 

Kiran was born in the Western Cape and has travelled from his present home town of White River throughout Southern Africa as well as to Malaysia and also to Argentina on extended trips.  He visited Argentina as a Rotary Scholar representing the Nelspruit District. He has a broad perspective and insight into people with his eyes wide open to the world.

While summiting Kilimanjaro in order to raise funds and awareness for Cansa, Kiran kept a journal of his experiences which captured the mental intensity of the climb. He was named the Regional Cansa Debutant of the year as well as National Cansa Ambassador for South Africa and was featured on the SABC news. He is an enthusiastic rugby and hockey player at school level and a member of his school’s Toastmasters Club. He is involved with community leadership development programmes for Grade 10 and 11 students in the Thaba Chweu area, where he presents talks to peers on leadership. He has also given motivational talks at various schools in Gauteng and Mpumalanga on his Kilimanjaro climb and what it means to achieve a successful summit within oneself.
In 2015 he published his first book, Uncharted Connections.  The title came to him when he was at a particularly low ebb during his epic climb.  The book translates teens (he’s named them Fluorescents) for their parents / teachers, attempting to show confused adults why the generations are on such different tracks.

"Kilimanjaro... it never gives you what you plan, instead it has a plan for you..." One of the many wise quotes in this book. This book demonstrates that it is the same with love: love has no interest in leaving you as you were...Relatedness defines us. We mirror each other into existence. As long as you relate to your child as if he or she is changing (hopefully into a well-adapted citizen and someone employable) and you yourself are not open to vulnerability and evolution, the relationship deadens and contracts. As long as you are engaged from a place of your socially defined role, rather than your own living vitality, you cannot connect. Kiran shows how your child will give you monosyllabic answers in protest at this closedness. Shut you out. He shows how this shutdown is essentially a plea for real connection- protesting your 2D presence, your calcified being - your loss of your own life that results in thinking you know, a protest against your self - betrayals and compromises that have made you lose your own bliss. He helps us to see how, even while acknowledging what young people really need from their parents and other "adults" (we really do need new language), role-based relating translates into an inability to deeply embrace the fluorescent life force of the “adolescent".
NAVIGATION
NAVIGATION
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